• phone-call9851029803

    Call us for Booking(Saroj Katel)

  • envelopeinfo@corporatetreks.com

    Email us for further Enquiry

Nar Phu, Thorung La, Tilicho & Khopra Experience

Phu Gaon

I’m trekking in the Nar-Phu Valley, a remote and sparsely visited region near the Tibetan border which is open to tourism since 2002. The trail leads along the Phu River in a deep gorge; often the path is very exposed, cut into vertical cliffs hundreds of meters above the river. To the west is Pisang Peak, to the east is Mount Kanguru, the view back south is dominated by Lamjung Himal and the tremendous Annapurna II. I pass through old, abandoned Khampa settlements; with every step I walk north the landscape gets drier and drier.

After two days I reach Phu Gaon a few hundred of years back in time. Dark flat stone houses, prayer flags everywhere, narrow alleys. Next day I hike up the hill next to the village to the Tashi Lhakhang Gompa. The weather is perfect, the location of this small monastery beautiful. The hill is full of Chortens, colourful Mani walls and hundreds of prayer flags blowing in the wind.

Later on I continue towards Himlung Himal (7126m), the path is hard to find, I follow the moraine east. Altitude, strong wind, dehydration and the exertion all contribute to a splitting headache. From the top of the moraine I get my view of Himlung, Nemjung and Himjung, beautiful White Mountains, in stark contrast to the brown hills in this dry area.

Nar Gaon

Next day I walk from Phu Gaon to the other village in this area, Nar Gaon. I follow the valley south, after a few hours the path branches off to the west. The views are spectacular: Kanguru to the east, Lamjung Himal and Annapurna II south, Pisang Peak straight ahead looks rather bleak from the north.

Early afternoon I reach Nar Gaon. I stroll around the village, thinking about the next days. Tomorrow I want to set off early to cross the Kang La Pass (5322m). Then it begins to snow heavily.

Next morning the whole valley is covered with a thick layer of snow. All I can do today is stay here and wait. I go for a walk through the village, the warm sun melts the snow quickly. In the evening the weather finally improves. The sky clears, revealing Pisang Peak and Kanguru, illuminated red by the setting sun.

Kang La (5322m)

My alarm goes off at 3, at 3:30 I start from the lodge. The stars in the sky and my headlamp are guiding my way through the night. I move up the valley quickly, trying to reach the pass as early as possible before the clouds roll in. For some time I follow a little stream, the trail is faintly visible through the snow. I ascend the slope to my right, then I continue west. After a while the narrow valley opens up a bit. At the head of the valley I can now see the trail again, zigzagging up the slope towards the pass. After what feels like an eternity I reach the end of the valley and join the path again! Now the hard work begins, up the long, steep slope towards Kang La. The last few hundred meters are particularly strenuous, through knee-deep snow. I need to rest a lot, the view east is incredible. Manaslu, Ngadi Chuli, Himal Chuli can be seen in the far distance, Kanguru, Pisang Peak, Chombi and Gyaji Kang are shining bright in the early morning sun.

Finally I reach the pass (5322m), marked by a cairn with a sign and prayer flags. I’m glad I reached pass early enough, hardly any clouds in the sky. And what a view! The whole Annapurna range is unfolding before my eyes. Annapurna II (7937m) is simply breathtaking and dominates the view. Lamjung Himal and the Myabasa Danda ridge to the south-east, Annapurna III, Gangapurna, Roc Noir and Grande Barriere south-west. I can even see the very tops of Machhapuchhare and Annapurna I – a rare pleasure from the north.

I have a long break on the pass, and then I start the 1700m descent to Ngawal. The first few meters down are steep and treacherous, over loose, slippery slabs. Very slowly, step by step I make my way downwards.

After a while the slope eases. I take it easy for the rest of the descent; it’s a long but easy stroll down to Ngawal. At 11am I reach Ngawal. It is still early, I don’t feel too tired and so I continue to Manang. I’m now back on the popular Annapurna Circuit.


Great Ice Lake

From Manang I’m heading for Tilicho Lake (4920m). In Khangsar I stop for tea. From Khangsar I go on, after a while the infamous landslide area begins.

Quickly I continue on the narrow trail, past bizarre looking rock formations, the river deep below to my left. I stay the night at the Tilicho Base Camp Lodge. Next morning I have an early start, it snowed at night and the landscape looks winterly. Grande Barriere and Roc Noir get closer with each step, the view back on Gangapurna, Chulus and the Marsyangdi Valley is awesome.

 Soon the path eases; some more walking on flat ground, then the lake comes in sight!

Roc Noir and Tilicho Peak are hidden by clouds, small avalanches roar down the slopes of the Great Barrier. Glaciers reaching right into the lake are cracking loud. I walk around the viewpoint at the south-eastern shore, it is cold and windy and after a couple of hours I go back.

Thorong La (5416m)

Next morning I walk in bad weather from Shree Kharka to Thorong Phedi. I pass Gunsang, Yak Kharka, Ledar, and cross the suspension bridge between Ledar and Thorong Phedi. In the afternoon the weather improves, I walk through another landslide area but the path is well trodden and easy to negotiate. On the slopes above I can see plenty of blue sheep.

This is snow leopard territory and I constantly keep an eye out for the big cat – in vain. Eventually I reach the lodges of Thorong Phedi (4530m), the sky clears for sunset revealing great views back on Gangapurna.

Next day I start at 5 towards the Thorong La Pass. Day is already dawning, making my headlamp needless. It is a bitterly cold, clear morning. I follow the line of trekkers trudging up the hill. Then the sun finally rises over the mountains, warming me up instantly.

At 8 I reach the Thorong La (5416m), notched in between the sixthousanders Khatung Khang and Yakawa Kang. The view from the pass exceeds my expectations. The Chulu Peaks, Putrun Himal and the ever present Annapurna II are towering skyhigh in the east; the Kali Gandaki Valley lies deep below in the west.

It is extremely windy and I start the long descent to Muktinath very soon. I more or less run down, losing altitude quickly. Before noon I arrive in Muktinath (3760m), a sacred place for both Hindus and Buddhists. I spend some time resting and watching the many Indian and Nepalese pilgrims at the main temple, and then I go to the neighbouring town of Ranipauwa for lunch.

Kali Gandaki Valley

In the afternoon I continue to the medieval town of Jhong. From the slopes north of Jhong I get fantastic views on the Nilgiris, Tilicho Peak and Dhaulagiri I, even the top of elusive Annapurna I comes into sight.

Walking through Jhong I’m looking for a place to stay the night but all the lodges seem to be closed. I have no choice but to go on with heavy legs. Dead tired and just before sunset I arrive at Kagbeni.

Next day I spend the morning exploring town and its surrounding area. With its ancient houses and beautiful location at the Kali Gandaki River, this place blows me away.

For a short distance I walk north along the Kali Gandaki River to the tiny settlement of Tiri. Like yesterday the weather is just perfect. In Tiri I hike up to the small monastery for more beautiful views. From this vantage point I can peek into Mustang, the former Tibetan kingdom in the north.

Two days later, I’m heading south along the Kali Gandaki to Kalopani. I take it easy and do plenty of side trips off the main trail. In the beautiful village of Naurikot I stop for breakfast and enjoy the awesome views, especially on Dhaulagiri I, the seventh highest mountain in the world.

Dhaulagiri I (8167m)

I continue west from Naurikot and ascend the lower slopes of Dhaulagiri to a small cave and waterfall. From here views are even better. At this point the Kali Gandaki Valley is one of the deepest valleys in the world, with an altitude as low as 2550m in between the eight-thousanders Annapurna and Dhaulagiri.

Khayar Lake (4600m)

From the lodge at Kopra Dhanda I start at 5 towards Khayar Lake, a sacred lake for Hindus at the foot of Annapurna South. It’s a hazy morning, I’m praying for good weather today. The trail to the lake is okay to find, frequently walked by pilgrims. After a couple of hours I cross the snow line, at around 9 I reach the lake at ~4600m. The shore is lined with tridents and bells, symbols of the Hindu god Shiva. I circumambulate the lake, scramble on the slopes around and take in the wonderful scenery. Clouds come and go, allowing close-up views on Fang and Annapurna South occasionally.

Through thick fog I walk back, retracing my own footsteps in the snow. The atmosphere is eerie, the view very limited. Luckily it doesn’t rain.

Next day I descend in the rain from Kopra Dhanda to Tadapani through a dense forest. I pass Bayeuli and Dobato, in the afternoon I reach the lodges of Tadapani, beautifully located at a scenic clearing.

The trek comes to an end with a spectacular sunrise next morning, the Annapurnas rising majestically one last time.

Tadapani sunrise: Annapurna South, Hiunchuli, Annapurna III, Machhapuchare, Annapurna II

———–Tobias pantel, Germany —————————

Best view and Adventure route

Everest Region

Worldwide, Nepal is often recognized by the mammoth of a mountain called Sagarmatha or as popularly known Mount Everest. The highest peak in the world, standing proudly at 8848m, has earned Nepal the privilege of being home to the glorious Himalaya. Sagarmatha has never been considered just a mountain peak; in fact, Sagarmatha translates to the goddess of the sky and is of supreme significance to Nepal, Nepalese, their lifestyle, and belief. Mt. Everest attracts trekkers and peak climbers from around the world and showers them with moments that are inexplicable, and are best when experienced.

Land of Sherpa and High Himalayas

Everest has its recognition deeply spread across the country; however, Solukhumbu boasts the very location of the peak. As a result, Everest region recognizes itself as the vicinity around the Everest (8848m) which entails numerous towering peaks and Sagarmatha National Park as well. Everest region remains one of the finest works of nature as it bears the most diverse geography in all of Nepal. From highland mountains to highland valleys and mid valleys, the geography of the region is enticing itself. The Himalayas in the Everest region includes peaks like Mount Everest (8,848m), Lhotse (8,414m), Makalu (8,463m), Cho Oyu (8,188m), Nuptse (7,861m), etc. which are also some of the highest mountains in the world. Sherpa is the main inhabitants with others like Rai, Chhetri, and Tamang forming the majority of the populace.

World Famous Trekking to Expedition

Khumbu valley is the highland region which is worldwide famous for trekking and hiking. Kirat Kulung or Rai and Sherpa are the main inhabitants in this region. It includes the town of Namche Bazaar as well as the villages of Thame, Khumjung, Pangboche, Pheriche, and Khunde. The famous Buddhist monastery at Tengboche is also located in the Khumbu. The Khumbu region flaunts exquisite vistas of several ranges from various viewpoints as well as paves ways to base camps of the Sagarmatha, one which starts from Namche Bazaar and goes up to 5364 meters at the base camp. Limiting oneself to Everest Base Camp Trek would be shallow as the Everest region is more than that.

The Sagarmatha National Park, a renowned World Heritage site, features conserved endangered species of snow leopards, blue goats, mountain sheep, and so on. The treks in this region showcase the enthralling peaks and their ranges perfectly arranged before the backdrop of a clear blue sky and the glistening sun. The Khumjung village is famous for Sherpa culture which incorporates their legendary cuisine entirely consisting of barley and buckwheat. Sit down with the locals and take on the famous Tongba (processed malt beer) which not only warms you up for the extreme cold weather but rewards you with medical benefits as well. Gokyo valley and Khumbu valley are the major Himalayan valleys famous among the adventure and nature seekers. Gokyo Lake Trek, Three Passes Trek, Island peak climbing, Mera Peak climbing, Mount Everest Expedition, Ama Dablam Expedition, and Lobuche peak climbing are other popular adventure trips in Everest Region.

Everest Region Treks

The trek to Everest Base Camp includes only 14 days at the most but offers the same spectacular sceneries as when actually climbing the peak. With the support of an experienced crew and guides and enough rest days, the trek won’t leave you feeling too exhausted but instead rejuvenated and healthy. Gokyo Lake Trek carries various elements of the Everest Base Camp trek yet is able to provide a different experience due to its less busy seasonal grounds. The fairly moderate trek reaches up to 5360m at Gokyo Ri and shows the panoramic scene of Sagarmatha and its ranges along with a wide view of the Gokyo lakes. Similarly, the Three Passes Trek is rather adventurous than the two mentioned above as the trek crosses three of the highest passes in the region, namely: Renjo La (5360m), Cho La (5420m), and Kongma La (5535m).

Best time to Travel

September to November is the ideal time to enjoy trekking or any other mountaineering activities in the region. Due to the onset of autumn, during this time, the mountains look much livelier with the sky clear and with the ‘just right’ temperature.  

For the mountain lovers who do not have ample time, mountain flights and helicopter tours in the September-November early mornings provide you a face to face encounter with the giant minus the hard work. Even shorter treks like Everest Heli Trek are available for those in the time crunch.

The Everest region is defined by Sagarmatha but is not limited to it. Give this magical destination a thought and you’ll be surprised by the number of activities you will find worth doing here. Set your dates because the Everest region will guarantee you the best time of your life.

Tourism Year [Visit Nepal 2020]

Lifetime Experiences: Visit Nepal 2020

Travel, explore and learn—the three truths of life that will keep you moving forward towards happier times. Specifically however, travel to Nepal, explore this Southeast Asian nation’s natural wonders and learn the roots of the harmonic diverse culture it lays its foundation on. Snuggly fitted between two giants India in the south and China in the north, Nepal co-exists peacefully within these landlocked borders living up to its name of being the birthplace of the Enlightened Gautam Buddha. With a history of more than 5000 years, Nepal remains one of the few countries in the world which flourished on its own natural grounds of sacred culture without having to surrender to any colonist rule. Nepal today has embodied the past and the present with a rather tranquil approach and is ready to set out for the future to welcome travelers of around the globe for the ultimate tourism campaign: Visit Nepal 2020.

As the government has set a target to bring in two million tourists each year by 2020, the Ministry of Culture, Tourism and Civil Aviation (MoCTCA) has planned to organise ‘Visit Nepal Year’ in 2020 to attract more tourists to the country.  Nepal is set to share its ethereal beauty and competence to foreign tourists with efforts to promote a number of tourist targeted destinations and activities around the country. If Nepal had never crossed your mind for being an epic travel destination, it’s time you put it at the top of your list because no other country will offer the exquisite mix of nature and culture. From the 8000m and above peaks that touch the sky in the north and the deep gorges that cut hills into beautifully arranged vista in the south, this little nation is bound to leave you in awe by the unbelievable natural sceneries across the land. The ridges and mountains in the north is perfect for activities like trekking, peak climbing, mountain expeditions and so on while tours, jungle safaris and hiking are the best for plains and hills of the central and southern regions. Point anywhere on the map of Nepal, you’ll find at least one activity to do!

Some of the finest trek routes circle around great peaks like the Everest, Annapurna, Manaslu and Kanchenjunga. Others take you on a journey to the off beaten track that lead to quiet, untouched and equally enthralling valleys of Upper Mustang, Dolpa and Tsum. Pick your ability level and the resources you have and you’ll find a perfectly customized trek for you keeping in mind your convenience and comfort. Jungle safaris through the emerald forests of Chitwan, Khaptad and Bardiya will take you on a magical journey consisting of magical encounters with rare and conserved endangered species like the Bengal tiger, red pandas, one horned rhinoceros, snow leopards and others to name a few. For the botanists, you will be entering into treasure haven as special herbs, shrubs and trees are found plenty due to the diverse ecosystem.

Go on city tours to the famous historical valley of Kathmandu, Lalitpur and Bhaktapur where you can clearly see how the past meets the present. Ancient houses with discreetly beautiful architecture are found scattered throughout the city and remain as work of arts of legendary architects and crafters of ancient times. Walk into the three durbar squares of the three cities and you can find similarities among difference, all of them unique on their own but bearing the same atmosphere of preserved monumental sites. Among the popular heritage sites are the Pashupatinath, Swayambhunath, Naytapola, 55 Windows and others. Once your city tour is over, sit down at local food places which will offer you as diverse cuisine as the ethnic groups of Nepal. Always opt for at least one plate of Momo but don’t be afraid to try the local Newari cuisine consisting of sweet Yomari to spicy Chowilla. Guzzle down Tibetan tea or just opt for a true Nepali person’s staple diet of Daal (lentil soup), Bhat (rice) and Tarkari (steamed vegetables). The cuisine depends upon where you are and who the locals are so don’t be surprised if you can’t choose among the plethora o options.

One of the biggest parts of Nepal is the Nepali culture which is the epitome of harmony and tolerance between hundreds of diverse culture and the biggest part of these cultures are their festivals. Observe the epic celebration of Dashain and Tihar in mid to late October, the core festivals of the population. The communities like the Gurung, Tamang and Sherpa celebrate Lhosar, which consists of huge gathering of families coming together to have a good time. Experience a new take of Buddha Jayanti in Lumbini and Tiji festival in Upper Mustang.   

You don’t need to spend a lot for a memorable time. So, book your tickets for Nepal because 2020 will bring you lifetime experiences you will never forget!